Action Chess Match
Your rating:

Here you can find an opponent for a one-time games in Action Chess

Tournaments soon
LigthMap OverwatchCup
Players: 0 из 10   /  10 Oct, 11:00
Trust DotA2 1х1 S #3
Teams: 24 из 512   /  25 Sep, 16:00
Trust DotA2 1х1 S #4
Teams: 25 из 512   /  26 Sep, 16:00
Skill training

Test yourself!

and take your skills to the next level

Last Opinions

Strategy Examples in Click-Storm Action Chess. Part 5

Umaril
11.09.2019

Let's start with the definition (try to remember it).

Trade-happy
Adj.

  • Desiring to exchange or trade chess pieces regardless of the position.
  • Exchanging or trading chess pieces regardless of the position.
    Synonyms: Poor player, Newbie, Moron, "destined to lose"
    See also: stupid chess play, purple belt, idiocy, George W. Bush

Ok, now that you know the terminology, I will discuss piece trading.

  • To trade or not to trade? That is the clichéd Shakespeare allusion.

Situation: Black made a knight move on d4. White’s position is better: they are ahead with a knight and a bishop.

Our advice: Trade! White takes the knight to the bishop. When you have more pieces than your opponent, the exchange is more expedient. It's much easier to win when you have 3 pieces on the board, not 15.

Situation: Black made a knight move on d4. White’s position is worse: they have a bishop and a queen.

Our advice: Do not trade! You will have a better chance of winning if there are many pieces left on the board. Exchanging a bishop for a knight in this position will only reduce your chances of winning.

Situation: Black made a move with the bishop on d7. On the board is material equality.

Our advice: do not trade! This is a typical instance of trade-happiness on the part of white. The exchange of the knight for the bishop will weaken the White! A strong knight in the center of the board has a positional advantage and threatens Black. The bishop is at an impasse, surrounded by its pawns and in no way poses a danger to White. And White threatens all Black's combinations and attacks, so they should not give up thoughtlessly, exchanging for a useless bishop.

Situation: Black just made a knight move on d5. On the board is material equality.

Our advice: Trade! This knight will break you if you let him stay on this square. The only option is to take the knight with a bishop.

Situation: Black made a knight move on d3. On the board is material equality.

Our advice: Trade! Capturing the knight with the bishop will force Black to win back the pawn. And then you can win with this pawn.

Situation: White made a move with the bishop on d5. On the board is material equality.

Our advice: Do not trade! White has a weakened pawn structure with double pawns. Capture the bishop will allow White to win back the pawn, thereby getting rid of double pawns. As a rule, you should not trade if this splits structures with double pawns.

Situation: The bishop just finished its reload and managed to take Black's rook before reloading. The white queen on b3.

Our advice: Do not trade! Even if you are advised in any chess book to exchange the bishop for a rook, in this particular situation this is a bad idea.

Note: White could have gone a4-pawn since Black's rook moved to c4 (see topic 1).

Strategy Examples in Click-Storm Action Chess. Part 6

Other Click-Storm Action Chess content is in the article below:

All Click-Storm Action Chess Information